Backdoor Modules for Netgear, Linksys, and Other Routers

11 minute read Jan 13, 2014 Comments
A week or so ago, I read the news of a new backdoor on several devices, including those made by Belkin, Cisco, NetGear, Linksys, and several others. A list of what seems to be affected devices can be found here. Eloi Vanderbeken, who posted his findings on GitHub made the original discovery. He also wrote a useful python proof-of-concept exploit, which allowed command injection, but I wanted Metasploit integration.

Brainpan2

17 minute read Nov 20, 2013 Comments
Over on #vulnhub, there has been quite a chatter about Brainpan2, a “sequel” to Brainpan, by superkojiman. They’re even offering a 50 GBP award to whoever submits the best write-up! Since I enjoy challenges like this, I took a look at the machine. However, the writeup had to wait until the contest was complete, so that people didn’t cheat to win. The trolling, it begins early… I imported the VM into VMWare Fusion, and started finding the host.

Canon, Y U NO Security?

6 minute read Jun 18, 2013 Comments
I recently bought a new printer at home, so my wife could print coupons without manually attaching to my office printer each time (Thanks coupons.com and all the other shady sites that require spyware-like software to print coupons, and often don’t support network printers). I ended up picking up a Canon MX922. It works awesome for her, and is connected over WiFi, so any device in the house can print to it.

XBMC Traversal Metasploit Module

3 minute read Feb 25, 2013 Comments
Background I was talking in Intern0t several months ago. AcidGen, from IOActive mentioned that he found a bug in XBMC. I use XBMC quite a bit at home, on various platforms, since it’s extremely wife-friendly. I hit him up, and we started talking. We had a nice Skype conversation, where we discussed possible platforms that were affected, and future exploits that we’d like to find. Since I had a jailbroken Apple TV 2 and RaspberryPi, I told him that I could test those platforms and help out.

OverTheWire Natas Level 15

3 minute read Nov 14, 2012 Comments
Up until now, none of the OverTheWire Natas challenges really gave me that much of an issue. This one however, took me a couple hours to complete. Level 15 is a fun blind sql-injection vulnerability. It starts out with a username check dialog, which pretty much only gives you a binary value as to if a username exists or not. I looked at the source code, and couldn’t see any way to inject some SQL to get it to retrieve the password for me.

OverTheWire Natas Level 14

2 minute read Nov 13, 2012 Comments
The next level of the OverTheWire Natas wargame is Level 14, which introduces SQL Injection, a very popular subject as of late. The level starts out with a login dialog. The source code is fairly straight forward. It’s doing a basic authentication query. It however, does have a handy “debug” flag, that if set, will print the query used to the screen. <html> <head><link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="http://www.overthewire.org/wargames/natas/level.css"></head> <body> <h1>natas14</h1> <div id="content"> <?

OverTheWire Natas Level 13

3 minute read Nov 12, 2012 Comments
Level 13 of OverTheWire’s Natas wargame is extremely similar to Level 12. The only difference now, is that it’s validating that the file is in fact an image. This however is flawed, as exif data can be faked. It starts out with a similar upload prompt as last time. The source code is super similar to last time. <html> <head><link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="http://www.overthewire.org/wargames/natas/level.css"></head> <body> <h1>natas13</h1> <div id="content"> For security reasons, we now only accept image files!

OverTheWire Natas Level 12

3 minute read Nov 11, 2012 Comments
The next level to attack in the OverTheWire Natas wargame, is Level 12, which is more “real-world” as well, since developers often forget to limit file extensions. It starts out giving you the option to upload a <1KB file to the server. As with any other challenge, I viewed the source, to analyze it. <html> <head><link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="http://www.overthewire.org/wargames/natas/level.css"></head> <body> <h1>natas12</h1> <div id="content"> <? function genRandomString() { $length = 10; $characters = "0123456789abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"; $string = ""; for ($p = 0; $p < $length; $p++) { $string .

OverTheWire Natas Level 11

3 minute read Nov 10, 2012 Comments
Level 11 of the OverTheWire Natas wargames is a good one. It wasn’t one that could instantly be solved either. It involved programming, encryption, and HTTP. All fun! It started with a dialog to set the background color. When you click the “Set Color” button, it sets a cookie in your browser. But as the dialog says, the cookie is protected. I looked at the source code, as I always do.

OverTheWire Natas Level 10

1 minute read Nov 9, 2012 Comments
On to Level 10 of the OverTheWire Natas wargame! This level is extremely similar to level 9, except that now they are implementing a basic filtering, to prevent you from entering certain characters that could cause changes in the execution of the program. However, their filter is flawed. It starts out just like the last level, with a search dialog. Again, as always, I review the code since it’s available.
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